For Goodness Sake

For Goodness Sake

Sue Lepore
Program Lead – Inclusion

526 Upper Paradise Rd.
Hamilton ON L9C 5E3

Picture of a sample screen from For Goodness Sake programFor Goodness Sake, an applied approach to behavioural intervention for young children, is a resource for early childhood educators, community health nurses and teachers.
Through its interactive CD format with video host Paula Todd, For Goodness Sake combines training along with a system to guide practitioners and parents in developing action plans to address challenging behaviour and support pro-sociality. To assist parents, the program includes a Parents Guide brochure. PDF
For Goodness Sake was developed over a number of years by a team in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, with the lead role taken by Affiliated Services for Children and Youth.

Useage, Reviews, Comments
To date, over 400 copies of For Goodness Sake have been sold to a variety of community programs and services such as licensed child care programs, municipalities, public health departments, Boards of Education, Ontario Early Years Centres and agencies serving children with special needs and their families.

Recent feedback from licensed child care programs that have completed For Goodness Sake indicate they liked the step-by-step design of the training resource. Overall, supervisors of participating programs have noticed the tool has had a positive impact on staff.

The modules on observing behaviour, goal-setting and teaching strategies such as developing pro-social skills, improving co-operation and increasing motivation and engagement were deemed particularly useful by Early Childhood Educators.

“We have seen a great difference in the targetted children. This training resource raises awareness of families and increases willingness of staff. It has impacted all the children because the teachers have more time for everyone now that challenging behaviours have decreased.”
Angela Dauda, Program Manager, St. Matthew’s Children’s Centre located in a high-need area of Hamilton.

“This valuable and user-friendly tool responds to the constant requests from the early learning and child care community for resources to support them in guiding children’s behaviour.”
Wanda St. Francois, Executive Director at ASCY.

“Staff feel more confident in their observation skills and use For Goodness Sake as a reference.”
Shannon Murphy, Niwasa Head Start Early Learning and Care Centre.

“As we deepen our understanding about the critical importance of rich learning experiences for children from zero to seven years old, we are recognizing the powerful value in improving our understanding of the impact of children’s behaviour on their growth. For Goodness Sake is a marvelous learning tool for educators and teachers that will enrich anyone’s knowledge about how children behave and why they behave the way they do.”
Martin Keast, President School Division, Pearson Education Canada

What It's For

Background

For Goodness Sake, an applied approach to behavioural intervention for young children, was developed in Hamilton as a resource for early childhood educators and caregivers who are dealing with challenging and aggressive behaviour among children in their care.

With the support of funding from the Ontario Trillium Foundation and the Hamilton Community Foundation, the resource was developed by the Hamilton Early Learning Partners for Best Practice (HELP-BP) and produced by MJM Productions and Electra Communications of Hamilton.

Through its interactive CD format, For Goodness Sake combines training along with a system to guide educators in developing action plans to address challenging behaviour and enhance interactions with children, parents and team-mates.

Why It's Needed

For Goodness Sake responds to the need for support in dealing with young children who display challenging and aggressive behaviour.

The Early Years Study (McCain, Mustard 1999) indicates that early child development initiatives must include all children, including those living with special difficulties and challenges, yet in many cases, child care has been terminated due to behaviour.

Furthermore, disruptive, acting out or aggressive behaviours are the most common reason for referral to children’s health services (Offord, Boyle and Szatmari, 1987).

Interventions that focus on training parents and caregivers to modify their interactions with their children (Fick, 2001) have shown success in decreasing disruptive behaviours.

Content: Weeks One Through Six

For Goodness Sake overview PDF

Week One: Where Are We At Now?

Overview1_1Overview1_4The teachers will meet to talk about the caregiving situation. They’ll examine how well they’re working as a team, their stress level, attitudes and organization in the classroom. They will also make sure they have up-to-date information about the child and the family.

Then over the next week, the teachers will observe the child in class and at play to see what makes him happy and content.


Week Two: Is This Child’s Development Typical?

Overview2_1Overview2_2Teachers will review child development in six areas of skill: self-control and social skills, cognitive, motor, emotional and communication skills.

The teaching team will discover the child’s areas of strength and weakness, and choose specific new skills to teach.


Week Three: Observing the Challenging Behaviour

Overview3_5Overview3_3The teachers will take a look at the child’s challenging behaviour and examine the conditions surrounding it. Throughout the next week, they will make notes on the challenging behaviour – its severity and duration, the time of day it occurs, who is with him at the time, what’s happening before to trigger the behaviour, and what kind of response follows.


Week Four: The Learning Environment

Overview4_1Overview4_5This week, the teachers will focus on the learning environment to see how it may be affecting the child’s behaviour. The team will look at the physical environment – the layout of the classroom, the routines and activities. They will also look at the emotional environment – does the child feel comfortable and secure in the class? Does he or she have a good connection with teachers and other children?

The teaching team will learn whether they need to make changes in routines and activities to improve the physical environment. They will also look at ways to improve their interactions with the child. As a team, they’ll agree on specific strategies to improve the learning environment.


Week Five: Understanding Behaviour

Overview5_1Overview5_4The teachers will examine a typical model of behaviour; one that helps explain many of the factors that influence challenging behaviour. In order to help the child learn new skills and appropriate behaviour to replace the challenging behaviour, teachers need to have an understanding of the patterns which may be recurring for the child. They’ll then find out what happens to set off or trigger problems, and what response there is to the behaviour. They will then choose strategies to change the pattern of events and help the child meet his needs in a more positive way.


Week Six: Creating and Tracking a Long-Term Plan

Overview6_3Overview6_4Like anything new, it will take time for the child to learn new skills and behaviour. This week, the teaching team will review all the information they’ve gathered and strategies they’ve selected and set specific goals for both developmental skills and behaviour. They’ll choose strategies from the areas explored in weeks one through five: team functioning, family involvement, enhancing the learning environment, interactional techniques, and understanding the pattern of behaviour.


For Goodness Sake is a project of Affiliated Services for Children and Youth (ASCY), developed in collaboration with Hamilton Early Learning Partners for Best Practice.

Click here for a hard copy of the For Goodness Sake overview

Characteristics

The For Goodness Sake program:

  • Supports caregivers
  • Facilitates skill development
  • Provides a system
  • Is evidence and research-based
  • Is non-intrusive and non-aversive
  • Facilitates rapid, safe solutions
  • Advocates developmentally-appropriate interventions
  • Emphasizes child’s emotional and social well-being
  • Promotes emotional health and positive attitudes of caregivers
  • Is user-friendly, and a quick reference
  • Can be used in part or in whole
  • Supports varying levels of expertise
  • Includes real examples
  • Promotes seamless process for agencies
  • Is on an improvable, upgradeable platform

Contributors

It took a lot of good work from good people in the Hamilton area to build the For Goodness Sake program.

Instructional Design

Research: Benita Hopkins
Scripts & Video: Laurie McCurlie
Visual & Interactive Design: Bob Edmonds
Video Host: Paula Todd

Consultants

Carolyn Houlding, Children’s Hospital, Hamilton Health Sciences
Dr. Jean Clinton, Psychiatry & Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University
Dr. Larry Tuff, Psychiatry & Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University
Dr. Tracy Vaillancourt, Department of Psychology, McMaster University

Source Print Material

C. Houlding, & A. Clavette, (2003) Oh, Behave: A Support for Preventing and Responding to Behaviour Problems in Early Childhood Settings, Hamilton ON: BTCS Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation. BTCS Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation.
Contributors: Sylvie Chitty, St. Matthew’s House; Terry King, Community Living Hamilton; Donna Stares, St. Matthew’s House; Lois Saunders, ASCY
Editors: Chuck Meister, Hamilton Health Sciences; Dr. Larry Tuff, McMaster Children’s Hospital

On-screen Interviews

Wanda Amer, ECE; Matthew Brown, ECE; Sherry Brown; Monica Carruthers, ASCY; Dr. Jean Clinton, Psychiatry & Neurosciences, McMaster University; Carolyn Houlding, BTCS Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation; Genevieve McMurdie, St. Matthew’s House; Cathy Robb, ASCY; Lois Saunders, ASCY; Lisa Smith, CYW; Maria Thring, ECE; Dr. Larry Tuff, Psychiatry & Neurosciences, McMaster University; Dr. Tracy Vaillancourt, Department of Psychology, McMaster University

Project Steering Committee: Community Collaboration And Capacity Building Committee

Mary Pat Vollick, Chair CCCBC, Pumpkin Patch Daycare; Maria Baiardo, City of Hamilton; Kate Breznik, Mohawk College, Early Childhood Education; Donna Cadman, ECISS, St. Matthew’s House; Arlene Clavette, BTCS, Hamilton Health Sciences; Dr. Jean Clinton, McMaster University; Debbie Crickmore, McMaster Children’s Centre, Assoc. of Early Childhood Educators, Ontario (Hamilton Branch); Chair, Supervisor’s Network Hamilton; Donna Davis, ECISS, St. Matthew’s House; Nancy Dingwall, Hamilton Health Sciences; Linda Hancock, Hamilton Health Sciences; Wendy Hemphill, Ministry of Community, Family and Children’s Services, Hamilton Branch; Carolyn Houlding, Hamilton Health Sciences; Glenda McArthur, City of Hamilton; Kathleen Kitching, Hamilton Health Sciences; Susan Lepore, ECISS, St. Matthew’s House; Chuck Meister, Hamilton Health Sciences; Trish McComb, City of Hamilton; Ruth Rodgers, Hamilton & District Council of Cooperative Preschools; Lois Saunders, ASCY; Pat Senft, Hamilton Association for Community Living; Liz Soyka, ASCY; Lori Tomalty-Nusca, Hamilton Health Sciences; Dr. Larry Tuff, Hamilton Health Sciences; Janis Webster, Umbrella Board, Hamilton-Wentworth District Board of Education; Karen Woolner, City of Hamilton, Public Health and Community Services

Training Impact Research Committee

Dr. Jean Clinton, Chair Research Committee, McMaster University; Suzanne Brown, City of Hamilton; Erica Clark, City of Hamilton; Debbie Crickmore, McMaster Children’s Centre, Association of Early Childhood Education; Ruth Rodgers, Hamilton & District Council of Cooperative Preschools; Dr. Larry Tuff, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University; Dr. Tracy Vaillancourt, Department of Psychology, McMaster University; Mary Pat Vollick, Chair CCCBC, Pumpkin Patch Daycare

Additional Project Support

Amber Adams, Hamilton Health Sciences, Shelley Bradaric and staff, Waterdown Children’s Centre, Trish Lipinski, Hamilton Health Science

What It Does

The For Goodness Sake program:

  • Fills a service gap in the area of consultation regarding challenging behaviour
  • Addresses the need in a way that is efficient in terms of deployment of community resources
  • Supports skill development among parents, caregivers and early childhood educators
  • Addresses the societal concern that Fraser Mustard speaks to in the Early Years Report, i.e. the urgency of not meeting the needs of our young children and their caregivers, considered to be the real brain drain for Canadian culture (Early Years Report, 1999)
  • Supports injury reduction through pro-social skill development (i.e. injuries resulting from conflict and aggression between children and their peers in group settings)

Sponsors

This project has been made possible with the generous sponsorship and support of:

  • The Ontario Trillium Foundation
  • The Hamilton Community Foundation
  • City of Hamilton, Community Services Department, Social Development and Early Childhood Services
  • Ministry of Children and Youth Services
  • McMaster Children’s Hospital
  • MJM Productions
  • Electra Communications
  • Paula Todd, TVOntario
  • McMaster University Community – University Research Alliance Program (CURA)

Ordering Information

See Order Form

“In their early years, children do not intentionally misbehave. They react to situations based on the skills they have at their disposal.”

For Goodness Sake, an applied approach to behavioural intervention for young children, is a resource for early childhood educators, community health nurses and teachers.

Through its interactive CD format, forgoodness sake combines training along with a system to guide practitioners and parents in developing action plans to address challenging behaviour and support pro-sociality.

Features include video tips from professionals who specialize in child development and sound, researched practices and strategies.

Featuring

Dr. Jean Clinton, Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University
Dr. Larry Tuff, McMaster Children’s Hospital, Chedoke Child and Family Centre
Dr. Tracy Vaillancourt, Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University

Video Host

Paula Todd

The cost of For Goodness Sake is $250.00.
The benefits are priceless!
Copyright 2006

For Goodness Sake is a project of Affiliated Services for Children and Youth (ASCY), developed in collaboration with Hamilton Early Learning Partners for Best Practice in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

We would like to acknowledge the support of McMaster University, Community-University Research Alliance Program (CURA) for the evaluation of For Goodness Sake.

Pour commander le DVD forgoodness sake français appuyez ici.


Contrast & Text Size

    
   
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Translate this website